Mind the Celebrity Bump – Pregnancy after 45, yay or nay?

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Scrolling down through my Instagram feed yesterday, the story below from Elle USA jumped out at me:

‘Rachel Weisz and Daniel Craig are expecting a child together – how sweet! And they’re not together that long either,’ I thought to myself. ‘Just when did they get together, a year or so ago?’

A quick check on Google categorically contradicted my musings… 2010! They have been together since 2010, all of eight years ago! I remember thinking back then that since Rachel was about 40 she might just about have time to have another baby (she had one son already!). So by my calculations, that would now make her 48! All of 48! Wow! Two years older than Halle Berry when she announced her last pregnancy, at the advanced (maternally speaking) age of 46.

I couldn’t help but be impressed as even though I had my Lulu at the relatively advanced age of 40, I would hate to resign myself to the thought that that was that! I would probably like to cling to the hope, however remote, that that wasn’t that after all and that just maybe… one day… before I turn 50… Who knows?!

But then, on the other hand, Rachel Weisz, much like Halle Berry, is an A list celebrity and it is hard to put too much weight on their fertility miracles as they have so much… um… help at their disposal. So the question always remains whether us mere mortals could follow suit…

After all, as long as I’ve been on the baby train, there has been nothing but scaremongering in the press (or is that just my impression?) about the sorry state of female fertility and how it allegedly falls off a cliff after the age of thirty-five and is then further reduced to negligible levels post forty-five.

However, having witnessed many of my peers and the peers of my siblings (who are almost ten years older than me!) fall pregnant numerous times with very healthy babies well into their forties, I have begun to question the validity of such reports.

Indeed, a quick scan of the comments section to the same story on The Daily Mail Online (www.dailymail.co.uk – I am ever so slightly addicted, I’m afraid) will turn up similar anecdotes from average everyday people, just like you and me, claiming that their mother or grandmother had healthy babies well into their forties and quite often, on the cusp of fifty… Gasp!

‘My Nin was 48 when she had my dad in 1941 – no fertility treatment there,’ proclaimed a commenter known as Only Jax.

‘Big congratulations to them both. For those saying it’s too old, I had my daughter at 44 – she’s now 3.5 years old and is the light in our lives – funny, caring, clever and everything else you would wish your child to be. I didn’t want to be an older mum but I hadn’t met the right man earlier so I waited and I guess that’s the way things turned out. My only regret is that she will be an only child but we will make sure she is surrounded by a loving family and we will make the best of it,’ added another commenter who goes by the name of Andri.

‘My Gran was late 40’s in 1937 when she had my Mum… change of life baby they used to call that I believe. Nobody batted an eye and there was certainly no IVF involved. Nature works her own magic sometimes. These two people will be fit as fiddles no doubt and will able to care for a baby in every way necessary. Congrats to the family,’ said yet another by the name of saywhatchasee.

And these are only three out of many such comments in a sea of more than 2,000 altogether (yes, this story seems to really have got people talking, and commenting!).

Taking such comments together with my own experiences and other stories I have heard of women suddenly falling pregnant on the threshold of the menopause when they couldn’t before, I am convinced that fertility is a lot more complex than the (literal) age-old argument would have us believe.

What do you think? Have you heard of/had any late in life pregnancies?

I would really love to hear your thoughts and/or anecdotes in the comments section below.

Until the next time…

💋 Mostly Mum

 

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